Community ChampionsShaping a Better City

BRINGING BACK THE NEIGHBOURING RELATIONSHIP

‘What does it mean to love our actual neighbours?’

Howard Lawrence is exploring what happens when we activate the invitation to love those within our neighbourhoods. He says the idea has sprung forth that “maybe God is calling us to love our actual neighbours.”

“It’s a powerful notion, it’s a challenging notion for people to say what does it mean to love our actual neighbours?”
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COOPERATION AND COLLABORATION KEY TO ENVIRONMENTAL BREAKTHROUGHS

Key messages from Alberta Ecotrust Foundation’s Environmental Gathering: Breaking Through

When it comes to finding solutions to the world’s most pressing environmental problems, people need to talk with each other more, find common ground, and support each other in making positive change. People need to work together – and everyone needs to be involved.

Those were some of the key messages at the Alberta Ecotrust Foundation’s second annual Environmental Gathering: Breaking Through, which took place last month.
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ABUNDANT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE UPDATES ABCD PRINCIPLES FOR MUNICIPALITIES

Neighbourhood connections create complex benefits 

Howard Lawrence, co-founder of the Asset-Based Neighbourhood Organizing Association, says many cities have a long-standing relationship with Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) and the Abundant Community Initiative is a new version that drills down onto every block in every neighbourhood.

“We can say to municipalities, ‘you’ve been doing this kind of work, particularly in troubled neighbourhoods, for 30 years . . . here is an update,’” Lawrence says.
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Cohousing : The Legacy of a Danish Social Entrepreneur

What really makes sense for people in late twentieth century, western industrialized societies?

The man who started cohousing in Denmark, and therefore the man who started cohousing, Jan Gudmand-Høyerdied a few days ago at 81 years old. In 1964 Jan gathered together friends and acquaintances to talk about housing. He asked them to imagine a lifestyle and a place that did not yet exist, a place that could suit the needs of ordinary citizens, an intentional place that was different from what mom and pop, or grandma and grandpa had created for themselves. “What really makes sense for people in late twentieth century, western industrialized societies?” was his query.
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Building Resilient Communities: Thriving in the Face of Uncertainty

With Mark Lakeman and Friends

Anyone can act to change the world for the better, using the tools, skills, education and resources they have right now.

“It’s about people making new choices,” says architect and ‘placemaker’ Mark Lakeman, a leader in the development of sustainable public places in the U.S. and Canada. “Community building is a consciousness project. Consciousness can actually shift to a place with such joy that it really is irrepressible.”
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The New EconomyCreating a Thriveable Future

Mind the Gap: new approaches to Wealth Inequality

The Poverty Studies Summer Institute at Ambrose University

Just two years ago, in January 2015, the unemployment rate in Alberta was hovering around 4.6%. Today, it is about double that at 8.8%.

Statistics like these do little to describe the extent of the hardship some Albertans are facing these days. Fortunately organizations like the Canadian Poverty Institute at Ambrose University are searching for solutions to end poverty in Canada.
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How to create a Business which is good and smart

Thrive launches new program to help entrepreneurs grow and create community impact

Calgary social entrepreneurs with a desire to grow and improve business skills are invited to apply for Thrive’s spring Accelerator program. The program is also designed for existing entrepreneurs that are curious about integrating social and environmental impact into their business.
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1000 Families

Building the Assets of People and Communities

There are families in Alberta living on $22,000/year. Anyone who buys groceries knows that $22,000 doesn’t go far. According to Statistics Canada, the poverty line – also known as the low-income cut-off (or “LICO”) – is a family income of $44,000/year. A family of four living below the LICO devotes a larger share of its
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Do You Know Where Your Money is?

Or New Frontiers for Local Investing!

Do you know where your money is? Most of us don’t, and if we did, we might be dismayed to find that it’s invested in the very companies we avoid like the plague. Or at the very least, we sometimes roll over in the middle of the night, when our money hasn’t come home yet and wonder . . .in which country is it hanging out? Doing what?
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GETTING OUR GEEK ON

“I find that everyone is geeky in their own way,” Chic Geek’s founder, Kylie Toh, says encouragingly.

Chic Geek is a volunteer-run, safe and supportive group that holds a place for women to try out technology in Calgary. It hosts meet-ups and seminars for the tech-curious, and next week, on November 16, will present their “Geeky Summit.”
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Reading the Community Tea Leaves

Seeing the Future of a Successful Business District: Community and Commerce

Did you know the Kensington Business District was the location of one of the highest participation events in the launch of Harry Potter and The Cursed Child, the latest from the Land of Harry Potter? There were Harrys, Hermiones and Dumbledores taking over the streets of Kensington as they lined up to get the new book from Pages bookstore.
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Events

    Neighbourhood Edition: Section C

    11/02/2017 @ 9:30 am - 2:00 pm - Neighbourhood Edition:  Section C - Abundant Communities Calgary, Getting it started in Calgary and in your neighbourhood Saturday February 11, 9:30am – 2:00 pm Awaken Church (located at Bow Waters community Church) 6508 Bowwood Dr N.W. Become an Individual member and get a discounted rate. Who should attend? Neighbours who think that they could be more
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